30 books 30 days: Week One

This is my wrap up of the first week in my April TBR challenge. I think it was around the third or fourth day in April I decided to do this challenge having thankfully already read two manga collections and a short novel which helped my number count from the beginning. In the first week of the challenge I have read seven books!

1: Deathnote Vol II by Tsugumi Ohba and Takeshi Obata

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Read: April  3rd making it the fourth of April when I started this challenge. I thoroughly enjoyed this volume and hope to do a series review once I’ve read the subsequent volumes. Doing a review in this way will allow me to give an honest review without being concerned with spoilers etc.

 

 

2: Strange Weather in Tokyo by Hiromi Kawakami

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Tsukiko is in her late 30s and living alone when one night she happens to meet one of her former high school teachers, ‘Sensei’, in a bar. He is at least thirty years her senior, retired and, she presumes, a widower. After this initial encounter, the pair continue to meet occasionally to share food and drink sake, and as the seasons pass – from spring cherry blossom to autumnal mushrooms – Tsukiko and Sensei come to develop a hesitant intimacy which tilts awkwardly and poignantly into love.

Perfectly constructed, funny, and moving, Strange Weather in Tokyo is a tale of modern Japan and old-fashioned romance.

Also read on April 3rd.  This is a slow paced romance which I did enjoy however this one was just an average read in my opinion. I did not particularly love any of Kawakami’s characters although I did find the writing beautiful and appreciated the added Haiku study.

 

 

3: Orange The Complete Collection 1 by  Ichigo Takano

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On the day that Naho begins 11th grade, she receives a letter from herself ten years in the future. At first, she writes it off as a prank, but as the letter’s predictions come true one by one, Naho realizes that the letter might be the real deal. Her future self tells Naho that a new transfer student, a boy named Kakeru, will soon join her class. The letter begs Naho to watch over him, saying that only Naho can save Kakeru from a terrible future. Who is this mystery boy, and can Naho save him from his destiny? This is the heart-wrenching sci-fi romance that has over million copies in print in Japan!

Again read on April 3rd. This manga series is unlike any I’ve read before (although I have only ever tried four different series excluding this one) and while I know some people believe it has no staying power, I think it has a sort of subtle brilliance. The storyline is sad and juggles both reality and science fiction. I like the cast of characters and will be continuing with the series.

 

 

4: The Tiger’s Wife by Téa Obreht

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Having sifted through everything I have heard about the tiger and his wife, I can tell you that this much is fact: in April of 1941, without declaration or warning, the German bombs started falling over the city and did not stop for three days. The tiger did not know that they were bombs…

A tiger escapes from the local zoo, padding through the ruined streets and onwards, to a ridge above the Balkan village of Galina. His nocturnal visits hold the villagers in a terrified thrall. But for one boy, the tiger is a thing of magic – Shere Khan awoken from the pages of The Jungle Book.

Natalia is the granddaughter of that boy. Now a doctor, she is visiting orphanages after another war has devastated the Balkans. On this journey, she receives word of her beloved grandfather’s death, far from their home, in circumstances shrouded in mystery.

From fragments of stories her grandfather told her as a child, Natalia realizes he may have died searching for ‘the deathless man’, a vagabond who was said to be immortal. Struggling to understand why a man of science would undertake such a quest, she stumbles upon a clue that will lead her to a tattered copy of The Jungle Book, and then to the extraordinary story of the tiger’s wife.

Read on April 5th. I may end up writing a review for one book per week of this challenge. You can find my review in two parts: (Part One)  (Part Two)

 

 

5: A Streetcat named Bob by James Bowen

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When James Bowen found an injured, ginger street cat curled up in the hallway of his sheltered accommodation, he had no idea just how much his life was about to change. James was living hand to mouth on the streets of London and the last thing he needed was a pet.
Yet James couldn’t resist helping the strikingly intelligent tom cat, whom he quickly christened Bob. He slowly nursed Bob back to health and then sent the cat on his way, imagining he would never see him again. But Bob had other ideas.

Soon the two were inseparable and their diverse, comic and occasionally dangerous adventures would transform both their lives, slowly healing the scars of each other’s troubled pasts.

A Street Cat Named Bob is a moving and uplifting story that will touch the heart of anyone who reads it.

I believe this was my first non-fiction book of the year which I finished reading yesterday, April 6th. Bowen’s story made me laugh and very nearly cry. I thought it was fast-paced and easy to read. However, I feel like the book did not have a conclusive ending, it seemed as though the book was ended on a whim.

 

6: Agnes Grey by Anne Brontë

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At age 19 Anne Brontë left home and worked as a governess for a few years before becoming a writer. Agnes Grey was an 1847 novel based on her experience as a governess. Bronte depicts the precarious position of a governess and how that can affect a young woman. Agnes was the daughter of a minister whose family was in financial difficulty. She has only a few choices for employment. Agnes experiences the difficulty of reining in spoiled children and how wealth can corrupt morals.

Also read yesterday, April 6th. I had several problems with this novel. The first being that Agnes Grey is supposed to be a loveable and moral character. Personally, I did not like Brontë’s protagonist who, in my opinion, made no real, honest human connection after leaving her family’s home. It’s fair to say from the last statement that I was not a fan of the romance either. That being said I am more than happy to acknowledge that Agnes Grey is, for its time, a feminist novel and is therefore indisputably of high importance. I realise when writing this that I will have to write a separate review of this novel as I clearly have more to say than I had initially thought, which is also a good thing, if you are interested this review will be up over the weekend.

 

7: The Metamorphosis and Other Stories by Franz Kafka, translated by Joyce Crick

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‘When Gregor Samsa woke one morning from uneasy dreams, he found himself transformed into some kind of monstrous vermin.’

With a bewildering blend of the everyday and the fantastical, Kafka thus begins his most famous short story, The Metamorphosis. A commercial traveller is unexpectedly freed from his dreary job by his inexplicable transformation into an insect, which drastically alters his relationship with his family. Kafka considered publishing it with two of the stories included here in a volume to be called Punishments. The Judgement also concerns family tensions, when a power struggle between father and son ends with the father passing an enigmatic judgement on the helpless son. The third story, In the Penal Colony, explores questions of power, justice, punishment, and the meaning of pain in a colonial setting. These three stories are flanked by two very different works. Meditation, the first book Kafka published, consists of light, whimsical, often poignant mood-pictures, while in the autobiographical Letter to his Father, Kafka analyses his difficult relationship in forensic and devastating detail.

For the 125th anniversary of Kafka’s birth comes an astonishing new translation of his best-known stories, in a spectacular graphic package.

Table of contents:

Meditation
The Judgement
The Metamorphosis
In the Penal Colony
(Autobiographical) Letter to his Father

I finished reading this collection today. After reading The Trial a couple of years ago I was really excited to read more Kafka, my favourite part of this collection was the letter he wrote to his father. While I did not enjoy this collection as much as I hoped, or as much as I enjoyed The Trial, I still find Kafka’s writing beautiful.

 

 

Sophie

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April TBR Challenge: 30 books in 30 days

After watching a Beyond the Pages video about her current reading challenge, to read 30 books in 30 days, I have decided to also partake. This post will be a list of books that I hope to read this month. At the end of each week I will be doing a wrap up of my reading, I am hoping to stick exactly to the schedule below. Wish me luck!

Days 1-7

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Days 8-14

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Days 15-21

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Days 22-30

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Sophie

Try a Chapter Tag

I have decided to do the Try a Chapter today. This challenge if you are unaware consists of reading the first chapter of however many books you wish (I am doing 5) and then comment as to how you think the book will go, your first impressions etc. The 5 books I have chosen are the following.

Great Expectations by Charles Dickens- 4 pages
The Cardturner by Louis Sachar- 2 pages
White Noise by Don Delillo- 2 pages
A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini- 5 pages
Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood- 3 pages

Anyway here we go…

Great Expectations by Charles Dickens- 4 pages

I have never read Dickens before, I have watched a Muppets Christmas Carol and Oliver Twist before but I somehow get the impression that the novels are much different after reading this first chapter. The main character in this Chapter is Pip, who is visiting his mother and fathers gravesite as well as his 5 younger brothers as well. Quite a sombre event as he dwells over the 6 tombstones, this however is rudely interrupted by what Pip can only describe as a pirate comes into the picture shouting and threatening Pip not to run away or he will kill him. He then interrogates Pip and asks for a favour he asks for as much food as possible and a file (a file and some wittle’s as he says) he also states that if he doesn’t bring these then the mysterious younger man hiding in the area will not hesitate to disembowel him. Pip then runs home to fetch the items requested.

So quite a violent first chapter, however I did find it quite funny that in order to scare Pip into doing what he wants there is a mysterious little man there to act as the enforcer. This just seems too funny to me and happily unexpected. I do enjoy a book that can make you laugh and so far this has. I do hope Pip doesn’t get killed as he seems to have had a pretty crappy life so far. Fingers Crossed.


The Cardturner by Louis Sachar- 2 pages

A short first chapter and not much really happens. I have read Holes and of course seen the movie and enjoyed those so I am intrigued by this novel. I did have a quick look at the blurb just to try and work out where the story is going and it turns out it is about the card game bridge. I have never played this game and can’t say I have ever been bothered in learning how to play but there is a time to learn everything and hopefully I will be able to gleam the rules by reading this book. The first chapter is about Alton Richards and his ‘favourite uncle’ Lester who was only his favourite Uncle because he was hugely wealthy. His mother has forced him to worm his way into his Uncles good books hoping that he will be looked upon favourably on the event of his death.

A very strange concept and a one I am intrigued to carry on reading. It feels very much like a strange indie movie that you watch and at the end even though you’re a little confused you also come to the conclusion that is a goof film. So for that reason I will be reading further and hope things heat up.


White Noise by Don Delillo- 2 pages

At only 2 pages long it is hard for much of an impact, it has made me intrigued but for the most part a little confused. Everything seemed to be quite chaotic in the first few paragraphs as the scene unfolds with all of the students arriving with their parents to college for the first day of the year. Then all of a sudden the narrator is discussing his job as the Chairman of the department of Hitler studies at the College on the Hill. I can picture him standing in his office looking out over all of the cars pulling up and unloading all of the students belongings into their new dorms over the road. The narrator who is the main character also goes on to confirm that he actually created the idea for Hitler Studies which became a huge success with someone who later died in a ski lift accident in Austria (seems a little coincidental don’t you think?) The final paragraph is a little out of the blue and describes missing pets posters attached to the streetlamp’s around the street.

A strange ending but quite an intriguing concept. Clearly this is going to be quite a serious book due to the topic it is likely to cover. However I can’t help but sense that there may be a bit of humour due to the random snippets of useless information and quirky writing style. I definitely think I will continue to read this and look for to it.

A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini- 5 pages

After previously reading the Kite Runner I already have high hopes for this one. I loved the Kite Runner and have only heard good things about this one. The first chapter here sheds light onto the main character Mariam, a harami, illegitimate child who lives with Nana her mother in a poor part of a Herat, Mariam doesn’t leave the house and rarely does anything that she has not already been told to do. The first chapter introduces three characters. First of all as already stated is Mariam the main character, it also introduces Nana, Mariams mother and finally Jalil, Mariam’s father who comes to visit. Jalil is a very well connected and wealthy man with three wives and nine legitimate children. He has a huge house with servants, Nana used to be a servant until as Hosseini puts it, her belly swelled up, and then she was thrown out and banished. So this is already clear that these two women Nana and Mariam have been thrown out in order to try and clear Jalil’s conscience and to hide his treachery.

So far I can kind of see where this is going, without having a sneaky peak at the blurb I would say that Mariam is going to be discovered by Jalil’s three wives and all hell is going to break lose. All I can really say is that I am excited to see how it continues as Hosseini is an incredible writer. I can’t wait to continue reading.


Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood- 3 pages

As already know that this is a bit of a thriller I am not that surprised that this chapter didn’t leave much of a clue as to what is going on. It simply try to get your attention in order for you to keep on reading. This is a flashback as the final sentence is ‘This is what I told Dr Jordan’. It states that the main character, name not yet disclosed, is a prisoner, however it doesn’t state whether this is a prison (Jail) or someones house as she gets locked into a cellar. It all is a bit confusing as to whether or not the character is good or bad. A hard chapter to analyse as there isn’t much to go on.

I am looking forward to reading this further as I can only assume it will start to make more and more sense as the novel goes on. I am intrigued enough by Sophie’s recommendation and the first chapter that I will be continuing this also.Maybe not the next thing I pick up bit I will be picking it up again.

Happy Reading

 

Danny

 

The Art of Being Normal – Mini Review

A Mini Review on where I am currently up to in The Art of Being Normal by Lisa Williamson. According to my Good Reads app I am 73% through the book. I would therefore like to reflect on what I have read so far.

I knew that this was going to be quite different to my usual read, but hey what are challenges for. I may drop spoilers in here so please tread carefully. The book comprises of 2 boys in High School. The first chapter is David Piper, it is only one page, well actually half of a page and it basically states that David is not quite happy with himself, in fact he states that he would like to be a girl as he believes that he was born the wrong gender. It then becomes about how now named and seen as David is coping with this and what society thinks of her and why she can only tell her 2 really close friends the full truth.

This is definitely an insight in to how, I can only imagine, a lot of people feel and is not recognised by society as acceptable and as a result ridicule and bullying ensues. The other character in the novel is Leo Denton who shares the limelight of the novel; he comes from the wrong side of the tracks and is expected to be a bit of a psycho as he came from a bad school into David’s nice (posh) school. His transfer is one that is on the lips of many students, how can anyone get expelled from that school and he must have been really bad etc.

Leo and David become friends after an incident in which Leo sticks up for David when her bully is abusing her. This lumps them both in detention and as a result they become friends. Leo is a lot more against the relationship than David is, keeping up his reclusive hard-man routine.

So far I am enjoying the book, I don’t think I am enjoying it as much as Sophie and Amy did however I feel like this is simply because it is just so different and isn’t something I would normally pick up.

I did however enjoy the twist and look forward to completing the book. I hope it continues down the same road and there are more twists to come. I also hope that everything works out for the characters as I have become quite invested in their wellbeing.

That’s it for today. I’ll let you know what I thought of it further when I’ve finished.

Danny

Top 10 Tuesday – Top 5 (Lazy)

I have decided to take part in the Top 10 Tuesday by The Broke and the Bookish this week. This week it is the top 10 books that surprised me in either a good way or a bad way. I am only going to do my top 5 in this instance due to lack of time.

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We’re all Completely Beside Ourselves by Karen Joy Fowler – Sophie gave me this book as a recommendation, she really loved this book and talked about the twist and how amazing it was. I was very much unimpressed, I can’t tell whether I just didn’t actually enjoy the book or was it because I was expecting it to be so much more?

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The Graduate by Charles Webb – Another Sophie recommendation but this time I absolutely loved it. I read it mainly so Sophie and me could do a Movie Adaptation Monday. I ended up loving both the Book and the movie; in fact I would probably say it is now in my top 10 of all time.

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The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini – My first Hosseini Novel but definitely not my last. Again this was another Movie Adaptation Monday, I also had to read this at School (‘Had to’) I haven’t yet picked up anther of his Novels but I will be doing so this year.

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The Martian by Andy Weir – I had heard from my Bookstagram friends that this was a good read. I wasn’t sure what I was expecting but I definitely loved it. The writing is so funny and witty. I also love anything Space related and this was my ideal read.

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The Kill Order by James Dashner – I chose to read this (the Prequel) after watching the Maze Runner and enjoying the film. I did not enjoy the book. I am quite surprised that I finished this. It put me off reading any more of the series, which is a shame as the rest of the books, are supposed to be much better. I just don’t want to waste any more of my life.

I will look at my other five top ten books that surprised me in either a good way or a bad way another time.

 

Danny

Annual Reading Challenge

This year we are once more taking part in the annual reading challenge. We started doing this challenge last year and really enjoyed it. This year two people close to me have each chose five books for me to read during 2017. I will go through each set of recommended reads starting from least to most anticipated.

The first set of books are as follows:

1. The Grown Up by Gillian Flynn

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I read Gone Girl a couple of years ago and I really disliked it so this one is not top of my list but the point of this reading challenge is to read books that you wouldn’t normally pick up or haven’t got around to reading. This one is definitely one I wouldn’t pick up. Although I do like to read at least two works by an author before I pass judgement.  The GrownUp is about:

A Young woman making a living faking it as a cut price psychic (with some illegal soft-core sex work on the side.) She makes a decent wage mostly by telling people what they want to hear. But then she meets Susan Burke.

Susan moved to the city one year ago with her husband and 15 year-old stepson Miles. They live in a Victorian house called Carterhook Manor. Susan has become convinced that some malevolent spirit is inhabiting their home. The young woman doesn’t believe in exorcism or the supernatural. However when she enters the house for  the first time, she begins to feel it too, as if the very house is watching her, waiting, biding its time…. 

 

2. Still Alice by Lisa Genova

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This one I’m looking forward to although I would probably never get around to buying it myself as there is just so many books higher on my list. I will most definitely watch the movie after reading the novel. I am a little apprehensive about the issues touched upon in the novel, more specifically Early-Onset Alzheimer’s as it will be difficult to read about. This also makes me dubious about the quality of the novel as it is a very challenging subject to write about in fiction. Blurb…

Alice is just fifty when she finds herself in a downward spiral, increasingly disoriented and forgetful. A university professor, wife and mother of three, she has books to write, places to see, grandchildren to meet. But now a tragic diagnosis early-onset Alzeimer’s disease is set to change her life- and her relationship with her family and the world- forever. 

Losing her yesterdays, living for each day, her short-term memory is hanging by a frayed thread. But she is still Alice.

3. Angelfall by Susan Ee

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I am intrigued by this novel about an angel apocalypse. A rare hardly-talked-about YA dystopia. I have little to go on with this one so here is the blurb…

It’s been six weeks since angels of the apocalypse descended to demolish the modern world. Street gangs rule the day while fear and superstition rule the night. When warrior angels fly away with a helpless little girl, her seventeen year old sister, Penryn, will do anything to get her back.

Anything, including making a deal with an enemy angel.

Raffe is a warrior who lies broken and wingless on the street. After eons of fighting his own battles, he finds himself being rescued from a desperate situation by a half-straved teenage girl.

Traveling through a dark and twisted Northern California, they have only each other to rely on for survival. Together, they journey toward the angels’ stronghold in SanFrancisco where Penryn will risk everything to rescue her sister, and Raffe will put himself at the mercy of his greatest enemies for the chance to be made whole again.

4. Sophie’s Choice by William Styron

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Another book with its own movie, so its safe to say I’m excited for this one. It’s also the only classic novel recommended to me this year. As I’m hoping to read more classics this year than ever before therefore I am grateful for this recommendation. Sophie’s Choice is a very famous story though I am not aware of any of the details so I am still expecting a few surprises.

Stingo, an inexperienced twenty-year-old Southerner, takes us back to the summer of 1947 and a boarding house in a leafy Brooklyn suburb. There he meets Nathan, a fiery Jewish intellectual; and Sophie, a beautiful and fragile Polish Catholic. Sting is drawn into the heart of their passionate and destructive relationship as witness, confidant and supplicant. Ultimately, he arrives at the dark core of Sophie’s past: her memories of pre-war Poland, the concentration camp and-  the essence of her terrible secret- her choice.

5. Map of the Invisible World by Tash Aw

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I am really looking forward to this novel. Interestingly, four of the five authors recommended to me here I’ve never read before. I am expecting another emotional novel and simply can’t wait for this one:

In the hustle and bustle of sixties Indonesia, two orphaned brothers are adopted by very different families: Johan, by a wealthy Malaysian couple living in Kuala Lumpur, and Adam, by a Dutch painter, Karl, from a simple coastal town in Indonesia. As they grow up, Adam often wonders about his older brother, while Johan is wracked with guilt at the memory of leaving him.

In Indonesia itself, the shadow of colonialism is causing civil unrest; and foreigners are treated with increasing hostility, especially the Dutch. When Karl is arrested, Adam vows to do everything he can to find him.

This extraordinary tale perfectly captures the turmoil of a country teetering on the brink of war; and the experiences of the two young men in an exotic yet turbulent and often frightening world.

The second set of recommended reads are:

1. Half Bad by Sally Green

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Out of this selection of recommended reads Half Bad is my least anticipated novel. Simply because, yet again, I do not know much about it and have not heard many reviews. Also, I have only just noticed that the red pattern on the book is actually a face, I thought it was blood/smoke before but that’s a whole other story, I am really not observant. Blurb…

Sixteen-year-old Nathan lives in a cage: beaten, shackled, trained to kill. In a modern-day England where two warring factions of witches live amongst humans, Nathan is an abomination, the illegitimate son of the world’s most terrifying and violent witch, Marcus. Nathan’s only hope for survival is to escape his captors, track down Marcus, and receive the three gifts that will bring him into his own magical powers—before it’s too late. But how can Nathan find his father when there is no one safe to trust, not even family, not even the girl he loves?

Half Bad is an international sensation and the start of a brilliant trilogy: a gripping tale of alienation and the indomitable will to survive.

2. Sinner by Maggie Stiefvater

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Similarly to the Gillian Flynn novel I have previously read a novel I did not enjoy by Maggie Stiefvater. I read Lament a couple of years ago and was not a fan. However my sister is a big fan of Stiefvater and I am more than willing to give Sinner a fair chance. This is a companion novel to the Shiver, Linger and Forever Trilogy. I have taken the blurb from Goodreads and am not expecting to be blown away, I am going into it with an open mind nevertheless…

found.
Cole St. Clair has come to California for one reason: to get Isabel Culpeper back. She fled from his damaged, drained life, and damaged and drained it even more. He doesn’t just want her. He needs her.

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Isabel is trying to build herself a life in Los Angeles. It’s not really working. She can play the game as well as all the other fakes…but what’s the point? What is there to win?

sinner.
Cole and Isabel share a past that never seemed to have a future. They have the power to save each other and the power to tear each other apart. The only thing for certain is that they cannot let go. 

3. Monster by Naoki Urasawa

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As previously mentioned I started reading Manga last year and I am eager to read more. I have heard that the Monster series is like Deathnote minus the supernatural elements. I’ve yet to find out for myself but it’s fair to say this is a highly anticipated read! Blurb…

Everyone faces uncertainty at some point in their lives. Even a brilliant surgeon like Kenzo Tenma is no exception. But there’s no way for him to know that his decision to stop chasing professional success and instead concentrate on his oath to save peoples’ lives will result in the birth of an abomination. The questions of good and evil now take on a terrifyingly real dimension.

Years later, in Germany during the tumultuous post-reunification period, middle-aged childless couples are being killed one after another.
The serial killer’s identity is known.
The reasons why he kills are not.
Dr. Tenma sets out on a journey to find the killer’s twin sister, who may hold some clues to solving the enigma of the “Monster.”

4. Rumi

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I have also been challenged to read poetry! I couldn’t be happier with this choice especially because I have not read Rumi (Other than a few lines) before. I will without a doubt be writing a posted dedicated to Rumi’s poetry.

5. Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe

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Marlowe is a familiar figure to me due to my English degree and I’m really really excited to read another play this year. Every time someone recommends a play to me I read it, unfortunately, this rarely happens. Hopefully that will change and hopefully I will be recommending this play to people soon. The blurb (as it’s a play) is short but attention-grabbing…

One of the glories of Elizabethan drama: Marlowe’s powerful retelling of the story of the learned German doctor who sells his soul to the devil in exchange for knowledge and power.

Have you read any of the novels/poetry or the play mentioned above? If so, what did you think?

Sophie

 

Annual Reading Challenge meets Judge a Book by its Cover Challenge (Inception)

We did this same Challenge Last year, this challenge is between me and Amy, Sophie’s little sister. Sophie and Christie are also doing the same thing. First of all I will run through my thoughts on each book by judging the cover (I know don’t judge! get it…) I will also read the blurb and pass comment on the same. If you have ready any of these then please do not hesitate to comment you opinions below.

The 5 books Amy challenged me to read this year are:

  1. I am the Messenger by Markus Zusak
  2. The Fellowship of the Ring by J.R.R.Tolkien
  3. The Art of being Normal by Lisa Williamson
  4. Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo
  5. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

So down to my reviews

  1. I am the Messenger by Markus Zusak

Front Cover

First of all I will say that last year I was challenged by Christie to read The Book Thief by Markus Zusak and absolutely loved it. I am therefore really excited before even reading the first word on the blurb. The front cover shows a blurred yellow Taxi which kind of reminds me of New York. Other than that there is what looks like another vehicle, potentially another cab going much quicker and therefore is even more blurred. I think from just looking at the front cover all I can assume is that this novel is not set in the same era as Zusak’s other book. If I was to go literally then I would say about a man or woman (maybe a cab driver) in New York who is there to deliver a message. This is probably completely wrong but I am writing this off the cover alone.

Blurb

I am not going to write the blurb down here as I am too lazy however I am happy to say I was right with the Taxi Driver, the blurb makes the character seem younger than I was expecting though I don’t really know what I was expecting. The concept of this, sounds kind of like a vigilante revenge story until it reads “Who’s behind Ed’s Message?” This gives the implication that something either happened to Ed to make him into a good person acting for what he deems is right or on a more sinister turn that someone is forcing him to act in the way he is. Obviously either way I will not know until I read but good news is I am quite intrigued by what I have seen so far.

 

  1. The Fellowship of the Ring by J.R.R.Tolkien

Front Cover

I have already read the Hobbit and seen all 6 movies in the Franchise, there is not much I can really say about this apart from the cover of this edition I have borrowed from Amy is pretty cool. It has the ring with elvish written around the circle and what looks like an eye of which I can only assume is Sauron. Either way I loved the Hobbit and am looking forward to reading this too.

Blurb

Again this is a bit pointless as I know what is going to happen however I am excited to see if the film missed any big parts from the book.

 

  1. The Art of Being Normal by Lisa Williamson

Front Cover

The Front cover here shows a Female silhouette (toilet stickman) ripping off an ‘outsershell’ of a male silhouette (toilet stickman) and standing proud. This gives me the impression that it is about gender identity and namely the transition of a male into a female. I am guessing it is about someones sex change and the story of whether or not this is normal in society. It may be about differing opinions on the issue and other peoples definition of being normal. Either way it is an interesting concept and it is probably not something I would generally pick up myself but that is the whole point of this challenge.

Blurb

The blurb has highlighted that this book is about the struggle of a young man in school who is not gay but rather doesn’t feel as though she was born the correct gender. Obviously this is interesting, it is hard to know whether or not the story is true to real expiriences unless of course Lisa was once Liam and then it would have a different meaning completely. Again I am interested however I wouldn’t have picked this myself.

 

  1. Six of Crows by Leigh Bardogo

Front Cover

This cover is very intriguing. It is is a crow mid flight over cloudy buildings and a phrase “Six Dangerous Outcasts. One Impossible Heist”. I am hopeful that this is going to be like a darker cooler Oceans Eleven. I would be likely to pick something up like this myself and therefore I am quite excited to read. I love books that are quick paced and keep you guessing I feel like this is going to be like that.

Blurb

So my idea of a darker cooler Oceans Eleven is a bit wrong as it sounds more like Lord of the Rings Meets the Italian Job. It has a lot more mythical aspects and creatures and it is more obvious that it is definitely a YA novel than just the cover alone. I am obviously not against YA as some of my favourite reads of last year were YA. I hope it lives up to expectations… I am excited for this but not as much as I am for the final choice.

 

  1. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

Front Cover

I know this is a classic and the Clothbound edition which I have borrowed from Amy doesn’t give much away. If I were to say what the book was about from the cover I would say it is about a chandelier salesman or maybe a chandelier hoarder. Either one does not seem likely…

Blurb

After finding the blurb online due to the lack of blurb on the Clothbound Classic I am really excited to read my first Dickens. Thank you Amy! I will be looking to review this as well. I know it is like a crazy famous classic with numerous adaptations. I cannot actually wait for this one and would probably put this at the top of my list.

 

Finally I think I will also do the Try a Chapter Challenge and try and rate the books from the first chapter of each. I will do that shortly. Anyway any questions or comments on Amy’s suggestions then let me know.

 

Danny.