Waiting for Wednesday!

I have seen this weekly feature on various wordpress accounts and think it’s a great way to hear about upcoming releases and to keep track of release dates.

Lately I have been addicted to Book Depository, expanding my wishlist almost daily. I also watch a lot of excellent booktubers who read a wide variety of genres. Therefore there are more than a few books and editions I am particularly excited for (such as the upcoming Macmillan Collector’s Library!) I will list a small portion of these below in order of publication.

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1.Three Craws by James Yorkston: 7th April

A thwarted artist returns home to rural Scotland in this bittersweet slacker debut by an acclaimed, internationally-renowned singer-songwriter. Johnny’s return from London to stay with best friend Stevie is the final admission that his dreams of being a great artist are dead. In Victoria Bus Station he meets Mikey, a deranged low-level dealer, who is from the same area. As Johnny tries to get his life back on track, living in a tiny cottage with Stevie, Mikey won’t leave them alone, a constant presence destabilising everything around him. As Johnny tries to hang on to the only job he can get, Mikey’s actions threaten his livelihood and Stevie’s sanity. In a blackly comic climax, events take a sinister turn. Can Johnny and Stevie survive the consequences or will they be dragged down by their unwanted ‘friend’? Three Craws is a beautifully evoked portrait of contemporary rural life for those dealt a meagre hand.

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2. Zero K by Don DeLillo: 19th Ma

Jeffrey Lockhart’s father, Ross, is a billionaire in his sixties, with a younger wife, Artis Martineau, whose health is failing. Ross is the primary investor in a remote and secret compound where death is exquisitely controlled and bodies are preserved until a future time when biomedical advances and new technologies can return them to a life of transcendent promise. Jeff joins Ross and Artis at the compound to say “an uncertain farewell” to her as she surrenders her body. “We are born without choosing to be. Should we have to die in the same manner? Isn’t it a human glory to refuse to accept a certain fate?” These are the questions that haunt the novel and its memorable characters, and it is Ross Lockhart, most particularly, who feels a deep need to enter another dimension and awake to a new world. For his son, this is indefensible. Jeff, the book’s narrator, is committed to living, to experiencing “the mingled astonishments of our time, here, on earth.” Don DeLillo’s seductive, spectacularly observed and brilliant new novel weighs the darkness of the world-terrorism, floods, fires, famine, plague-against the beauty and humanity of everyday life; love, awe, “the intimate touch of earth and sun.”

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3. Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler: 16th June

‘You can’t get around Kate Battista as easily as all that.’ Kate Battista is feeling stuck. How did she end up running house and home for her eccentric scientist father and uppity, pretty younger sister Bunny? Plus, she’s always in trouble at work – her pre-school charges adore her, but the adults don’t always appreciate her unusual opinions and forthright manner. Dr Battista has other problems. After years out in the academic wilderness, he is on the verge of a breakthrough. His research could help millions. There’s only one problem: his brilliant young lab assistant, Pyotr, is about to be deported. And without Pyotr…When Dr Battista cooks up an outrageous plan that will enable Pyotr to stay in the country, he’s relying – as usual – on Kate to help him. Kate is furious: this time he’s really asking too much. But will she be able to resist the two men’s touchingly ludicrous campaign to win her round? Anne Tyler’s retelling of The Taming of the Shrew asks whether a thoroughly modern, independent woman like Kate would ever sacrifice herself for a man. The answer is as individual, off-beat and funny as Kate herself. “Read her books and she can actually change your view, change how you see the world”. (Judy Finigan, Mail on Sunday). “Tyler writes with an apparent effortlessness which conceals great art”. (Helen Dunmore, Stylist). “Tyler’s sentences are wholly hers, instantly recognisable and impossible to duplicate”. (Hanya Yanigihara, Observer). “A new novel from Tyler is always a treat”. (Daily Mail).

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4. The Odessans by Irina Ratushinskaya: 14th July

An epic and engrossing novel set at the beginning of the twentieth century, THE ODESSANS is the story of three families from Odessa in the Ukraine: the Russian Petrovs, the Jewish Geibers, and the Teslenkos, who are of Ukrainian and Polish descent. Throughout years of war, famine, political struggle and incredible hardship, their deep friendships sustain each of the families. Their lives are rent by tragedy; some friends are hounded by anti-Semites, while others join opposite sides in the Civil War or are forced to flee to Odessa. But through it all, their characteristic good humour and faith in each other enable their close circle to survive.

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5.Iraq +100: Stories from Another Iraq by By (author) Nasra Jadwe , By (author) Kaki Khaled , By (author) Jalal Naim Hasan , By (author) Ahmed Sadaawi , By (author) Ali Bader , Edited by Hassan Blasim: 27th Oct

Iraq + 100 poses a question to contemporary Iraqi writers: what might your home city look like in the year 2103 exactly 100 years after the disastrous American and British-led invasion of Iraq? How might that war reach across a century of repair and rebirth, and affect the state of the country its politics, its religion, its language, its culture and how might Iraq have finally escaped its chaos, and found its own peace, a hundred years down the line? As well as being an exercise in escaping the politics of the present, this anthology is also an opportunity for a hotbed of contemporary Arabic writers to offer its own spin on science fiction and fantasy.”

 

Thanks for reading,

Sophie

 

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